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Kitschy Indian art has always been a likely winner at international ad festivals. Here we see a classic formula. Sex + Ethnic art = Silver

Just hoping a few truckers out there are actually using this, because the problem is real and the packs out there, far too few. Tata Motors really should make this a nation-wide campaign (if it isn’t already) so that every highway-blaring driver out there gets these colourful, uber distracting condoms to rip and place atop a creaky cot under the stars.

Via – CC, of The Sole Sisters & here.

p.s –

Dipper refers to lorry headlights, not the organ.

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Nicobar (Good Earth’s hipster arm) has come out with an innovative little piece that is so connected to all they do and feel. A bar of chocolate crafted exclusively for Nicobar by the talented Mandakini (who was recently featured on their blog for her baked goodnesses). The bar’s packaging features their current tropical palette. How beautifully linked and delicious.

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Pics: From the Nicobar FB page and site.

Doug (dhug means cloud in Marathi) is a hand-crafted bracelet made by women cotton farmers in India to raise money in times of drought. It’s poetic that they’ve chosen the cloud to be a symbol of this hopeful initiative.

The packaging is a simple brown with the thought neatly laid out on the front and the bracelet displayed almost like it’s a floating cloud.

It’s easy-to-make, great to look at and can be neatly parceled off to those who want to help.

Get your Doug here.

 

 

If you blindly love stationery, place an order for Origin One’s surprise box of goodies that’s hand picked from their own collection of design-drooled ware.

Apart from the packaging that comes tied in shoe-lace inspired string and a box that’s covered with enough to keep you from opening it, what I like is the thought. A surprise box you pay for. Fair. Fun.

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Order yours here.

Images: Origin One’s insta feed.

Olie is known for its island-inspired designs, natural fabrics and simplistic design sensibilities. So when I found that they had an entire section dedicated just to boxes, I was thrilled. Thrilled to note that they’re using left over fabric to make gifting and storing a pleasure.

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These boxes – available in rectangles, hexagonals, rounds and squares – are wrapped neatly in fabric and finished fine.

Ideal for storing your preciouses or gifting treasures to your preciouses.

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Find Olie ware here.

Intricately designed herb-and-plant illustrations grace the packages of Kama Ayurveda.

There’s a hint of old-world English charm and there’s a bouquet of aromatherapy-inspired paintings.

Paintings that seem to have been done with a fine, fine brush and a magnifying glass.

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What I liked most was that the scent of the product and the visuals on the package appealed equally to the nose and the eye. Kama also seems to have taken care to research the herbs for each product, stylise it, add magic to it and then develop it into memorable packs that would inspire you to cut it up and use it as bookmarks.

Find Kama here.

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In the 80s, apart from Camco, rat sweets were the next big thing.

Jeera candy was found in a variety of packages – from windmills to faces and slow cars.

This morning, however, a maid brought this for my friend’s daughter. And it was so kitsch that I kept it and was quite sure it needed to be featured on PII.

This bird is light-weight, uses bad plastic and has claws for a stopper. It holds around 100 jeera candy sweets, which are traditionally called rat sweets. I assume rat kaka looks like this (sans the colours, of course). The eye is a sticker that is scarily lifelike.

Makes for a perfect Halloween treat.

Pics taken on an iPhone. Feel free to use it.

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