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Kitschy Indian art has always been a likely winner at international ad festivals. Here we see a classic formula. Sex + Ethnic art = Silver

Just hoping a few truckers out there are actually using this, because the problem is real and the packs out there, far too few. Tata Motors really should make this a nation-wide campaign (if it isn’t already) so that every highway-blaring driver out there gets these colourful, uber distracting condoms to rip and place atop a creaky cot under the stars.

Via – CC, of The Sole Sisters & here.

p.s –

Dipper refers to lorry headlights, not the organ.

Found a tossed Bira cap in the garden, picked it up and pinned it up on someone’s softboard. Only because of the funky monkey on it.

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The rest of this new desi craft beer bottle and the colours on it are just as funky monkey. There’s White where the Bira monkey just stares straight ahead, and there’s Blonde where the Bira monkey holds out a peace sign in Freddie Mercury style.

BIRA-bottles-white-blonde-tallThe best part about the packaging is that they have a Growler. That’s a traditional jar used to carry beer from the brewery to your home. Keeps it fresh and bubbly.growlerimg01-1024x887

I found Bira at Thoms. And you can read more about Bira here.

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In the 80s, apart from Camco, rat sweets were the next big thing.

Jeera candy was found in a variety of packages – from windmills to faces and slow cars.

This morning, however, a maid brought this for my friend’s daughter. And it was so kitsch that I kept it and was quite sure it needed to be featured on PII.

This bird is light-weight, uses bad plastic and has claws for a stopper. It holds around 100 jeera candy sweets, which are traditionally called rat sweets. I assume rat kaka looks like this (sans the colours, of course). The eye is a sticker that is scarily lifelike.

Makes for a perfect Halloween treat.

Pics taken on an iPhone. Feel free to use it.

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Alta or Rose Bengal is a deep red dye made from lac and used to grace the feet and hands of women and dancers in the North East regions of India. I’ve always seen the dye in glass bottles that stain red even after using it once, making it difficult to store and handle, especially after one is dressed up. Glass bottles also make it scary to hold because if this breaks and falls you’ll have very deep red dye stains all over the place, forever.

So it was nice to find a plastic bottle shaped to be held comfortably. Found this one right outside a durga temple in Calcutta. Love the kitschness and joba-ness of the cover and love the shape of the bottle and the chauka depiction on the front. The chauka is the basic position in Odissi and symbolic of Lord Jagannath.

Not too sure how well that stopper will work once open, but will definitely be more seal-proof than the screw-type cap.

 

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Sturdy, intelligently designed (handle goes all the way down for extra strength) and roomy, the kirana shop bag is usually hung up in front of the shop where you can grab it and fill it with everything you need. The rectangular base makes sure it sits firm on the back of a cycle (or a car). The thin fabric or plastic is very pro-folding and tucking-into-bag too. But I’m still a sucker for the overall design :p

Via, Pii friend, Rang Decor author and photographer – Archana Srinivas. She pointed out that the site she found it on (here) had got it wrong. She’s emailed them :) Phew.

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The pack is the size of your forefinger. The detailing includes a Sumo wrestler called Petu Ram who loves to eat but survives because he regularly ingests the digestives enclosed in this bright pack with Poppins-inspired colours.

Image courtesy: Dipti Subramani, Pii-friend in Bombay.

It’s a book of 500 kitschy Indian matchbox covers in a book that’s designed to look like a matchbox, complete with slip case and striking edge, in case you feel like setting the whole book on fire. The printing quality is not too great (pixelated), but the finds are lovely, and it makes a great smoking-table book.

Via, Pii friend, Amulya Shruthi. Meet her here and here.

Buy the book and meet Tara here.

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